The family lawyers from Crossroads Law located in Vancouver BC and Calgary AB have a client centred approach to help you successfully navigate the family law system. Our experienced family and divorce lawyers author these blogs to provide you insight and to help you through this challenging time.

 

Publications Categorized "Matrimonial Property"


Diamond engagement ring on a glassy surface
Who Keeps the Engagement Ring After Separation in Alberta?

A question I hear a lot is, what happens to the engagement ring if we break up? As is so often the case in family law, the answer really depends on the circumstances. The main factor is what stage were the parties in their relationship when they separated.

Suburban house and lawn against a dusk sky
Divorce and Dower Rights in Alberta

Going through a divorce can create a number of issues that were never expected. Spousal support, child support, the division of matrimonial property and custody of children are generally areas that are known to those contemplating divorce or separation. 

Yacht in a marina reflecting in still water
Hidden Assets During Divorce

One of the most important steps in any separation or divorce is the disclosure process. Before the parties can determine how to divide matrimonial debts and assets, both sides need a complete understanding of what those debts and assets are.

Pale blue house and driveway with pink and blue sky
Common-law relationships 101

It may be the question family lawyers get asked the most: how long do I have to live with my partner until we are considered common-law? Generally, the law in British Columbia is 2 years, but there are some exceptions.

Set of keys on wooden surface with house-shaped key fob
Occupation Rent

At common law, joint tenants in a property enjoy equal rights to occupy the property. Neither co-owner has a right to exclude the other from the property.

Woman and toddler sitting on a large bed colouring with pencils and paper
RRSP’s in Divorce and Separation: Don’t Forget the Taxes

When dividing matrimonial property in a separation or divorce one of the biggest questions that we get is, “How do my spouse and I divide our RRSP’s?” & Is it Better to Transfer RRSP’s or Keep Them, and Pay my Spouse Out of Other Assets?

Womans hand signing documents
What documents do I need to provide my spouse after separation?

The exchange of information is critical in any family law case. Without the exchange of relevant information neither side in a legal action may know what their claim is, what their chance of success may be, or even if they have a case at all.

Woman draws shapes on paper for young girl to colour in on wooden table
What’s Mine is Ours, Unless it Isn’t: Matrimonial Property

When a married couple decides to get a divorce, one of the major issues that must be settled is division of property. Division of matrimonial property is governed by the Matrimonial Property Act in Alberta and the Family Law Act in BC.

Living room with wood flooring and white walls
How do I Force the Sale of Our Family Home?

Your ex stuck you with the bill for the family home, took off and you can’t afford to continue to pay the mortgage. Debt is adding up, and the taxes are due. Foreclosure is a real possibility. You need your ex to sign off on selling the property, and they refuse. How do you protect your credit, and the equity in the home? One option is to force to sale of the matrimonial home.

Man and young girl play with puppy on a bed
Custody of a Furbaby After Separation: Pets as Property

It is very clear that people love their pets. There are now pet spas and salons and pets can even get acupuncture. When divorce happens the issue of who gets Fluffy often arises and some people also want to know if they can claim support for pets like they would for children.

House entrance and yard with for sale sign
Show Me The Money: Forced Sale Of Home

Sometimes neither spouse can keep the family home because they cannot qualify for the mortgage on their own and they may not be able to find a cosigner. Also, one spouse may need to pay the other out if they keep the home because keeping the family home means that they will have more of the total family assets and property.  When spouses separate, all assets and debts needs to be identified and valued to determine who will get what.